Moshe Kam IEEE President
 
Picture of Moshe Kam lecturing in Peru IEEE is a strong and robust organization facing a number of significant and increasingly complex challenges.  Some of these challenges have been present for years, but so far have been resistant to our efforts to overcome them. Other challenges are more recent, resulting from the worldwide economic crisis of 2008-2009.

These challenges include:
  • Managing IEEE in a time of economical crisis – IEEE and its members are and will be affected by the global economic downturn.  We will need to be focused and wise: make sure we help our members – some of whom may need assistance in employment search, consulting opportunities and networking.  We may also see some softening in our lines of business.  At the same time, we will see opportunities – hiring new skilled staff who may be available in the current labor market, and engaging in strategic alliances, as well as mergers and acquisitions.
  • Effective services to practicing engineers – working engineers expect IEEE to provide programs and resources that will help them perform their job duties better. We need to respond to these needs by developing application-oriented publications, news technology alerts and websites, and provide high quality on-line tutorials on new technology and standards.
  • Expansion of IEEE’s technical scope – IEEE needs to expand rapidly and assertively into new technical areas and to identify new opportunities for technical progress and for cross disciplinary cooperation. We need to lead in areas such as Nanotechnology, MEMS, Mechatronics, Biometrics and RFID.
  • Shifting labor markets – our members are affected by global migration of engineering work across borders, decline of interest in engineering among the young in some countries, and quick (but often disorderly) expansion of engineering and technical professions in other countries.  We have the duty to develop new support and networking mechanisms that would replace the mechanisms that our members used to rely upon for professional development and employment search.
  • Slow growth of the membership – our membership grows at a rate which is much slower than the growth of the profession. Four fifths of our student members are no longer with us five years after graduation, meaning that we are not meeting their expectations.
  • The far-reaching impacts of Information Technology – while on-line delivery and electronic communication have improved the services of IEEE’s publications and conferences, they have also helped and emboldened our competitors. We face new fierce competition in the marketplace, and are prone to be affected significantly by trends such as ubiquitous video conferencing and the “open access” publishing movement.
IEEE is a strong and robust organization facing a number of significant and increasingly complex challenges.  Some of these challenges have been present for years, but thus far have been resistant to our efforts to overcome them.

For some of my solutions to these challenges see the Priorities section
 
Moshe Kam ( m.kam@ieee.org ) ECE Department, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
The opinions expressed on this website are the opinions of the author and not necessarily the opinions of the IEEE